Frost Amphitheater

Saturday, January 12, 2019
8:30 AM–4:00 PM
Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University

Free! Breakfast and lunch provided

This day of hands-on workshops, presentations, and discussions will explore the theory and practice of culturally responsive pedagogy and its relation to arts teaching and learning. Participants will discover how an understanding of students’ cultural frameworks can heighten learning and create truly inclusive classrooms, and will see the power of the arts to drive this approach.

 

Keynote Speaker

Dr. Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz, Ed.D.

Dr. Mi'Jan Celie Tho-Biaz, Ed.D. is a cultural leader, oral historian and multicultural educator with a passion for narratives of personal transformation and community social change.

 

One of Santa Fe New Mexican's 2017 "10 Who Made a Difference," and the University of San Francisco's 2018 Living the Mission award recipient, Mi'Jan currently serves as faculty with the Banff Centre, and is the founder of the statewide New Mexico Women of Color Nonprofit Leadership Initiative at the Santa Fe Community Foundation. Previously she led the Steinem Initiative's public policy digital storytelling pilot at Smith College. Mi'Jan has served as visiting scholar at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics at Columbia University, documentarian-in-residence at the Institute of American Indian Arts, teaching artist with adjudicated youth in Santa Fe's "Voces de Libertad" poetry program, and keynote presenter for the Create Justice Forum at Carnegie Hall.


 

Workshops

The most applicable grade levels are suggested for each workshop, but all sessions are applicable across K-12.

 

Rise Up! Disrupting the Master Narrative
10:10am–12:10pm | Suggested Grades: K-8

This workshop invites you to explore a range of historical and contemporary narratives. We will expose American held master narratives for their real functions and learn to see the ways they are unconsciously perpetuated in classroom practices. It offers insights and strategies for collaborative design of narratives that support belonging and bridging towards classroom cultures of truth, light and liberty. This workshop uses the cultural pop sensation of Hamilton, An American Musical to excite and engage learning. It incorporates movement in connection with text rendering and reading images. This workshop will provide strategies for using Studio Habits of Mind in connection with building, writing, and sharing stories across K-8. 

Led by Mariah Rankine-Landers and Jessa Brie Moreno

Mariah Rankine-Landers is the former Director of the Integrated Learning Specialist Program for the Alameda County Office of Education and current Director of School Transformation Through the Arts. She has co-founded Canerow, a place reflective of the histories, lives, experiences, and dreams of people of color; Chapter 510, that provides free in-school tutoring, creative writing workshops, and publishing opportunities for students in Oakland K-12; and Studio Pathways, an organization devoted to the transformation of teaching and learning through creative inquiry. Mariah's work and writings have been featured on The Electric Company (PBS), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Harvard School of Education, The Teaching Channel and Happy Black Girl. She says, “At the heart of my practice is a belief that students should have the opportunity to examine and understand life by engaging in it through the role of the arts. The artistic mind offers a lens on life that supports people’s ontological being rounded in full perspectives-a broader understanding of the social-emotional, political, physical, existential, economic, and ecological complexities that we all embody.”

 

Jessa Brie Moreno is Co-Director of School Transformation Through the Arts and the Integrated Learning Specialist Program in the Alameda County Office of Education. Moreno is Assistant Professor at the California Institute for Integral Studies and Theatre Arts Lecturer with San Jose State University. She is founding director of award-winning student theatre company OakTechRep and the Oakland Theatre Arts Initiative. She is currently the Local Advocacy Field Manager for the California Alliance for Arts Education, community organizing for advocacy and policy shifts for arts education statewide. Jessa's directorial work has appeared in collaborations with CalShakes, Stanford, San Jose Stage Co., and in Edinburgh, Scotland, and as an actor she performed with A.C.T., Marin Theatre Company, and TheatreWorks, among others. Her passions are theatre, directing, acting, story circles and firing up mirror neurons through empathetic listening.


 

Our Lives as a Template for Art Making
10:10am–12:10pm | Suggested Grades: 5-12

The creative process can be used by teachers and students as a tool to explore and reflect who we are and how we feel. In this workshop, Stanford Live Teaching Artist Armando Castellano and the Extended Infinity ensemble from Ravenswood Middle School in East Palo Alto will lead the participants through a creative performing arts-making process that can be applied in many avenues in your own classroom. RMS music teacher Sarah Moulder and guest composer Jesus Plascencia will join Armando to describe a process in which students offer input into a new musical work created for them to play alongside their teachers. We’ll learn how curriculum expands, students deepen their learning, and a sense of personal investment for both students and teachers grows through this experience.

Led by Armando Castellano

Armando Castellano is a musician and arts advocate. As a French horn player he performs professionally in regional orchestras and chamber ensembles throughout Northern California. Much of his time is spent performing with and managing his chamber ensemble, Quinteto Latino, an organization that advocates for classical music by Latin American and Latino composers through performance and education. As a bilingual teaching artist he has taught and lectured students and teachers in both English and Spanish, throughout the U.S. He has been a chamber musician for nearly two decades, and during that time, has been the proud recipient of Chamber Music America’s Rural Residency and Residency Partnership grants. He currently sits on the Chamber Music America Board of Directors, and has recently been selected to be Launchpad Artist by the Western Arts Alliance. Armando graduated from UCLA and the Manhattan School of Music.


 

Turn on the Lights: Professional Collaboration on Race, Power and Privilege
1:30pm–3:00pm | Suggested Grades: K-5

Grammy nominated musical group, Alphabet Rockers and transformational educator, Mariah Rankine-Landers have been connecting and building shared practices for 10 years. Mariah serves as one of the educational advisors to Alphabet Rockers having spent the last 20 years in education. Alphabet Rockers has been making music and centering our most complex issues for our young children for over a decade. Together they will share insights for the engaged practice of collaborative design between artist and educator and share best practices for talking about race, power, gender, and ablism with our youngest learners. Listen and learn more at alphabetrockers.com and at Studiopathways.org

Led by the Alphabet Rockers and Mariah Rankine-Landers

Oakland-based Alphabet Rockers have brought joy to tough topics through hip-hop since 2007. The Grammy-nominated group is known as the premiere children’s hip-hop artists who focus on social change and racial justice. Partnering with thought leaders on anti-bias and child development from U.C. Berkeley and World Trust, they create empowered, engaging concerts and activities for young children, families, and educators. In addition to concerts across the U.S., recordings and videos, the Alphabet Rockers teaching artists dedicate thousands of hours of educational services to schools, libraries, and communities.

Mariah Rankine-Landers is the former Director of the Integrated Learning Specialist Program for the Alameda County Office of Education and current Director of School Transformation Through the Arts. She has co-founded Canerow, a place reflective of the histories, lives, experiences, and dreams of people of color; Chapter 510, that provides free in-school tutoring, creative writing workshops, and publishing opportunities for students in Oakland K-12; and Studio Pathways, an organization devoted to the transformation of teaching and learning through creative inquiry. Mariah's work and writings have been featured on The Electric Company (PBS), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Harvard School of Education, The Teaching Channel and Happy Black Girl. She says, “At the heart of my practice is a belief that students should have the opportunity to examine and understand life by engaging in it through the role of the arts. The artistic mind offers a lens on life that supports people’s ontological being rounded in full perspectives-a broader understanding of the social-emotional, political, physical, existential, economic, and ecological complexities that we all embody.”


 

Confronting the White Gaze: Teaching through the Arts as Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy
1:30pm–3:00pm | Suggested Grades: 1-12

Culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) seeks to perpetuate and foster—to sustain—linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of schooling for positive social transformation and revitalization. As Alim and Paris (2017) write, “Instead of being oppressive, homogenizing forces, CSP asks us to reimagine schools as sites where diverse, heterogeneous practices are not only valued but sustained.” In this workshop, you will be introduced to the arts as culturally sustaining pedagogy. You will begin to consider the importance of developing partnerships with students, teaching artists, and community members, cultural experts already teaching through the arts and outside the "White gaze." Learn how resourceful educators work with communities, identifying place specific subject matter aims, all the while sustaining the lives, languages and cultures of youth. And as a prelude to questions and discussion, the presenters will share their experience using intergenerational and evolving Hip Hop and Indigenous arts practices as CSP, teaching diverse communities of learners in formal and informal settings.

Led by Jim Bequette and Casey Philip Wong

Jim Bequette is Associate Professor and Arts in Education Program Coordinator at the University of Minnesota. After 15 years teaching visual arts and photojournalism in K-12 schools with mostly California Indian students, Jim attended Stanford University, (MA ’00, PhD ’06), then joined UMN’s College of Education & Human Development. He teaches and advises PhD and Master’s students in the Curriculum & Instruction (CI) department, and is Co-Lead of K-12 Licensure Programs in Visual Arts, Theatre, and Dance. When asked to reimagine the CI art education program, Jim reworked the entire course catalog, changed the program name to Arts in Education, and launched an innovative model for preparing K-12 visual and performing arts teachers in interarts, non-siloed cohorts. Adding pathways for theatre and dance artists to become licensed teachers is one of Jim’s social justice aims. Culturally sustaining arts pedagogy taught from a critical perspective is another. In published research articles and chapters, Jim argues place specific culture-based arts education can heighten Native students’ engagement in Eurocentric schools and white teachers’ understanding of settler colonialism’s impact on Indigenous languages and material culture.

Casey Philip Wong is a PhD Candidate in the Race, Inequality and Language in Education Program at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education, Assistant Investigator for the Stanford University Institute for Diversity in the Arts’ Arts and Education Project, and a Research Associate for the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Language. He most recently co-authored the chapter “Policing and Performing Culture: Rethinking ‘Culture’ and the Role of the Arts in Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies” within the edited volume Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World. Casey has founded and taught within three after-school arts and mentoring programs serving hundreds of K-12 youth from the California Bay Area to New York City. He has worked as an in-school intervention specialist, and as a teacher's assistant within performing arts and restorative justice classrooms. He has taught as a middle-school after-school program teacher, sixth grade math and science independent studies teacher, and arts elective teacher. He is a retired Bboy, and an active beatmaker and martial artist.